YOU Really CAN Learn To Play!

YouCanDoIt

“I wish I could play the piano, but I’m too old!”  

“I wish I could play the piano, but with work and everything, I’m just too busy!”  

“I wish I could play the piano, but I JUST CAN’T…even after years of taking piano!”

“I wish I could play the piano, seriously, BUT…!!”

I’VE HEARD ALL THE EXCUSES!

MY STORY

I started taking piano lessons when I was seven years old.  I practiced 5 days a week, 30-minutes in the morning and 30-minutes in the afternoon.  When others kids were playing outside, I was working hard.  I was diligent for years, learning Bach, Beethoven, Chopin and others.  I never really liked the lessons, but I loved to perform…so I stayed with it (and, of course, my parents didn’t give me a choice).

Stan Sheridan21However, when I was only eleven years old, a young friend sat me down and taught me something called “chording”.  Chording is a simple approach to sitting down and playing what you hear — for me, it was the perfect companion to singing.  IT SERIOUSLY SET ME FREE!  Instead of just practicing, I was beginning to soar as a young musician.

 

Performing the same principles I am teaching on WORSHIP KEYBOARD – Key of C DVD,

>payed my way through college,

>put me on the biggest show on the road,

>and is now a big part of my school, the Genesis School of Music (www.GENESISalabama.com).

Grant

What exactly is “Chording”?

When you attend a typical music class, you learn the basics of piano theory — the whole note, the quarter note, the half rest, forte, mezzo forte, sharps, flats — which are VERY important.  You also learn how to apply this to the book, and of course, this teaches you to play by the book.  When you see a round symbol, colored in, on the fourth space of the top section, you know that’s a “High E” above “Middle C”.

And, again, VERY important.  Playing “Moonlight Sonata”, by Beethoven — which is packed with music theory — is so beautiful.  Love it!!  You can’t “chord” this song…or any song like this.

However, when you hear a song at church or on the radio and you want to go home and play it, you probably don’t think about Beethoven…you just want to sit down and get lost in the song.  You use “chording”.Stan

What is it?  Basically, chording is finding the basic chord pattern of each section of a song, and playing it.  Every section — the verse, the chorus, the bridge, etc. — has a basic pattern.  Sometimes, whole songs have the same pattern.  Chording is learning the basic chords and patterns and applying them to countless songs.  It’s the way every professional band musician is playing!

Walk into any studio and see what’s on the music stands — not music, but rather chord charts!  Every time!

IT’S TIME FOR YOU TO LEARN THE SAME PRINCIPLES!

What’s included in the Worship Keyboard – Key of C DVD?

> the basics of the piano

> locating the notes on the piano

> forming a basic chord (all white notes)

> applying the chords to a pattern

> applying the patterns to a song

> adding the “extras” between the chords

> adding the left hand (the bass)

Renee>applying everything to two specific songs, not forgetting that it can apply to millions of songs.

GET A SNEAK PEAK HERE>>

If you paid for this teaching in the classroom, it would take at least 1-2 months — around $230 worth of class time!  However, with the Worship Keyboard – Key of C DVD, you can play it again and again — stopping and starting at your skill level.  You will also have the ability to watch someone playing it for you!  All for a lot less than $230!

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Posted on January 8, 2016, in Worship General. Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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